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Archive: February 2016
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The movement of large portions of life to a more digital space has spawned a huge influx in data collection. Government agencies and private businesses alike are gathering massive amounts of information in a trend that has been dubbed big data. And yet, many of these organizations are struggling under the weight of all this raw data.  Read More

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The state of cyberwar

Posted on February 26, 2016
Category: Cybersecurity

As the Internet and similar technologies began to creep further into government operations, hacking became the go-to method for collecting intelligence about foreign entities. It was a lot easier than sending in a spy to figure out what other countries were up to, and it didn't involve risking anyone's life to do so. However, recent developments into what a country can do with a cyberattack have shown warfare itself might see a major overhaul due to the digital revolution.  Read More

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For years, the only place to actually get work done was in the office. An employee could expect to be able to get a certain amount of their duties done at home, but this was a rare occurrence and certainly didn't pertain to a full-day's work. Advancements in technology have changed this, with more organizations beginning to allow employees to complete tasks outside the office.  Read More

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A cyberattack on a private institution that works with U.S. intelligence agencies has revealed yet another flaw in how many government officials view cybersecurity. The hack of Juniper Networks, which was announced Dec. 17, 2015, has resulted in a data breach that could contain encrypted correspondence of government agencies spanning more than three years.  Read More

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Government bloated by data storage needs

Posted on February 18, 2016
Category: Data Center

It's no secret the government has been having trouble with its data storage. Collecting information on a national scale is incredibly daunting, but putting that data to good use has proven to be quite the challenge. Sorting through big data has massive potential, but current data center administrators simply can't spend time analyzing this information.  Read More

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Yet another cyberattack has befallen the American government. This time, the Department of Justice was the main target of the hackers, who got away with the information of nearly 20,000 DoJ employees, according to The Guardian. What's more, the cybercriminals also gained access to data on roughly 9,000 employees of the Department of Homeland Security, posting the information on an encrypted website that The Guardian then investigated.  Read More

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The state of Massachusetts is taking an interesting step into the digital world with an announcement that legislators are considering making body cameras a required piece of equipment for all police officers. Local news organization WWLP reported that Massachusetts law makers within the Committee on Public Safety are looking into a bill that would make this technology mandatory.  Read More

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In the wake of the infamous Office of Personnel Management data breach, government cybersecurity has arguably trumped every other concern when it comes to government technology services. Cloud computing and data center consolidation have both had their fair share of time in the spotlight in the past few months, but securing the immense quantity of sensitive data the federal agencies possess is still a top priority for government IT leaders. As such, feds have taken several key steps recently that underscore the importance of government cybersecurity.  Read More


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Cloud computing is safe, says US CIO

Posted on October 28, 2015 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

The U.S. government has no shortage of federal agencies that are suspicious of cloud migration. In early October, there were multiple reports that cloud adoption among federal agencies wasconsiderably behind schedule. One of the main factors impeding adoption was a lack of trust in cybersecurity and cloud vendors, especially in light of recent cyberattacks executed upon the Office of Personnel Management, which resulted in stolen personal information of millions of government workers.  Read More

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Data center consolidation will save Nebraska millions

Posted on October 26, 2015 0 comments
Category: Data Center

No company, organization or government can function without basic IT infrastructure services in the 21st century. Deploying and managing this infrastructure affordably has become a priority. When it comes to government technology services in particular, saving money, whether in the form of data center consolidation, cloud migration or through big data strategies, is essential. This was recently highlighted In Nebraska, where the state government has announced a plan to save around $5.3 million in IT costs over the next 10 years, according to the Lincoln Journal Star.  Read More

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Earlier this year, Baltimore experienced a barrage of protests, some of which devolved into riots, following the untimely death of Freddie Gray. The turmoil thrust the city into the media spotlight, and under closer scrutiny from the nation. And while the catalyst was a series of incidents involving local law enforcement's use of violence against African-Americans, the city has taken several steps recently in an attempt to improve the overall quality of life for its residents.  Read More

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As the federal government continues to ramp up its data center consolidation and cloud migration efforts, U.S. municipalities continue identifying new ways technology can improve infrastructure and quality of life for residents. One example of a pilot program that has generated results came in the form of San Francisco's use of surveillance technology to alleviate congestion of public transit. The Transit-Only Lane Enforcement (TOLE), which was first introduced in 2007, was signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown earlier this month, according to The San Francisco Examiner.  Read More

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Cloud Computing Caucus announces new leaders

Posted on October 15, 2015 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

Government cloud computing has been the focus of several government reports and headlines, especially since the implementation of the Cloud-First initiative in 2011. With many federal agencies gearing up for cloud migration, and many others still lagging behind, big changes are in the forecast for federal IT infrastructure. It is perhaps therefore fitting that Oct. 13, the Cloud Computing Caucus announced three new co-chairs: Reps. Barbara Comstock, Ted Lieu and Mark Walker.  Read More

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The use of big data strategies as crime-fighting tools on federal, state and local levels has been a hot topic recently. One successful stab at turning data into more actionable insight came in the form of an up-to-the-minute crime information system that helps spots trends in real time. The system will be used by Seattle law enforcement officials to improve response times, and possibly even reduce crime in the long term.  Read More

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US government reports early savings on IT infrastructure

Posted on October 13, 2015 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

The realm of government IT infrastructure has reported some mixed news in the past few months. On one hand, cloud migration among federal agencies is occurring more slowly than anticipated due primarily to security concerns. On the other hand, the federal government is already reaping some rewards from agencies that are in the process of finding ways to reduce spending on IT infrastructure.  Read More

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The problem of sifting through reservoirs of big data is not unique to federal IT services. On local and state levels, municipal entities must consider new and innovative approaches to harnessing what data is available to them, whether in the form of call recordings, public documents or traffic reports, to improve the community. In some cases, the implementation of effective data management can be a matter of life and death.  Read More

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The U.S. government was given a jolt to start virtualizing IT services thanks to the implementation of the cloud-first initiative in 2011, which mandated that federal agencies take full advantage of the capabilities of the cloud. Earlier this year, the Congressional Cloud Computing Caucus reinforced the priority with its release of the "Don't Be a Box Hugger" report. Among the top arguments in favor of cloud migration was the staggering $18.9 billion that could be saved over time by further embracing the cloud.  Read More

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How big data strategies can expedite government initiatives

Posted on October 07, 2015 0 comments
Category: Data Center

Many U.S. government agencies have spared no effort to capture massive quantities of data that can give them better insight into society or the respective sectors the agency serves. Some might even argue that the federal government has excelled at data collection to a fault. But the healthy majority of federal agencies are interested in using big data to benefit the public in concrete ways, and herein lies the biggest data-related challenge.  Read More