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Archive: February 2016
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The movement of large portions of life to a more digital space has spawned a huge influx in data collection. Government agencies and private businesses alike are gathering massive amounts of information in a trend that has been dubbed big data. And yet, many of these organizations are struggling under the weight of all this raw data.  Read More

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The state of cyberwar

Posted on February 26, 2016
Category: Cybersecurity

As the Internet and similar technologies began to creep further into government operations, hacking became the go-to method for collecting intelligence about foreign entities. It was a lot easier than sending in a spy to figure out what other countries were up to, and it didn't involve risking anyone's life to do so. However, recent developments into what a country can do with a cyberattack have shown warfare itself might see a major overhaul due to the digital revolution.  Read More

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For years, the only place to actually get work done was in the office. An employee could expect to be able to get a certain amount of their duties done at home, but this was a rare occurrence and certainly didn't pertain to a full-day's work. Advancements in technology have changed this, with more organizations beginning to allow employees to complete tasks outside the office.  Read More

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A cyberattack on a private institution that works with U.S. intelligence agencies has revealed yet another flaw in how many government officials view cybersecurity. The hack of Juniper Networks, which was announced Dec. 17, 2015, has resulted in a data breach that could contain encrypted correspondence of government agencies spanning more than three years.  Read More

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Government bloated by data storage needs

Posted on February 18, 2016
Category: Data Center

It's no secret the government has been having trouble with its data storage. Collecting information on a national scale is incredibly daunting, but putting that data to good use has proven to be quite the challenge. Sorting through big data has massive potential, but current data center administrators simply can't spend time analyzing this information.  Read More

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Yet another cyberattack has befallen the American government. This time, the Department of Justice was the main target of the hackers, who got away with the information of nearly 20,000 DoJ employees, according to The Guardian. What's more, the cybercriminals also gained access to data on roughly 9,000 employees of the Department of Homeland Security, posting the information on an encrypted website that The Guardian then investigated.  Read More

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The state of Massachusetts is taking an interesting step into the digital world with an announcement that legislators are considering making body cameras a required piece of equipment for all police officers. Local news organization WWLP reported that Massachusetts law makers within the Committee on Public Safety are looking into a bill that would make this technology mandatory.  Read More

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In the wake of the infamous Office of Personnel Management data breach, government cybersecurity has arguably trumped every other concern when it comes to government technology services. Cloud computing and data center consolidation have both had their fair share of time in the spotlight in the past few months, but securing the immense quantity of sensitive data the federal agencies possess is still a top priority for government IT leaders. As such, feds have taken several key steps recently that underscore the importance of government cybersecurity.  Read More


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The US Army is enlisting cloud computing

Posted on January 14, 2016 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

Government agencies have begun overhauling federal IT infrastructure in a bid to deflate the current IT budget, and improve technological efficiency. So far, most of the savings have been realized though data center consolidation – from the Navy to NASA, reducing the number of data storage facilities has been a top priority.  Read More

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Given recent revelations involving Edward Snowden and the U.S. government's use of information and communication technology as surveillance tools, it's not necessarily shocking that a November Pew {Research Center?} poll has revealed overwhelming distrust of Uncle Sam. Only 19 percent of respondents said that they trust the government the majority of the time, which represents the lowest percentage in the last 50 years. To pile on grievances, a recent Gallup poll has revealed that dissatisfaction with the U.S. government is the most commonly cited problem among Americans.  Read More

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Assessing Pentagon cloud computing

Posted on December 31, 2015 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

The value of cloud computing has been hotly debated in government circles. From a budget and efficiency perspective, there are big opportunities for improved data center consolidation, and wider avenues for enhanced collaboration within and among various agencies. Thus far, the only significant setback to adoption has been related to concerns about cybersecurity. Many agencies remain wary of their own ability to safeguard data that lives in the cloud.  Read More

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Data center consolidation is on the US Navy’s radar

Posted on December 30, 2015 0 comments
Category: Data Center

Government agencies have put data center consolidation at the core of efforts geared toward streamlining federal IT infrastructure. So far, success has been somewhat choppy. The U.S. Government Accountability Office did report savings of up to $3.6 billion – which data center consolidation contributed to – but learned shortly thereafter that 2,000 more data centers were in existence than previously believed. The setback resulted in the recent announcement of a new and forthcoming data center policy that may help get things back on track.  Read More

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Transitioning from legacy, on-premises IT solutions to cloud computing has been a top priority among government IT leadership in the past five years. Despite being slow off the starting line, recent studies revealed that government cloud computing spend is expected to increase from its current annual allotment of $2.4 billion to an estimated $6.2 billion by 2020. This growth rate outpaces that of the entire federal IT budget.  Read More

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New policy on data center consolidation in the making

Posted on December 22, 2015 0 comments
Category: Data Center

Data center efficiency is a growing concern among many organizations. These facilities are entirely necessary, but they are also tremendous sources of energy consumption. Worse yet, much of this energy consumption is unnecessary. According to the Natural Resource Defense Council, data centers in the U.S. could have consumed 40 percent less energy in 2013. In addition to wasting natural resources, this inefficiency results in needless spending.  Read More

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Cloud computing takes the lead in government IT spending

Posted on December 19, 2015 0 comments
Category: Cloud Computing

The U.S. government has been pushing its cloud-first agenda hard in the past few years in an attempt to improve data center consolidation efforts as well as collaboration between government agencies. In 2011, The Federal Cloud Strategy proposed allocating $20 billion of the total $80 billion IT spend on cloud computing. Since the release of the report, there have been numerous barriers to adoption, namely distrust of cloud computing among many federal agencies – despite repeated proclamations from federal CIO Tony Scott that cloud computing is safe.  Read More

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Information technology infrastructure represents a sizable chunk of government spending at the federal, state and municipal levels, hence recent efforts across the board to maximize IT efficiency. Everything from cloud migration and data center consolidation to streamlined big data aggregation and analytics can be a source of savings – that is, as long as it improves federal IT services. Most of these examples focus on specific technological renovations; however, as one of California's most recent policies reveals, there are other ways to go about making improvements to government operations.  Read More

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Cybersecurity has been front of mind for the government for as long there have been hackable systems, but the Office of Personnel Management breach that took place in early 2015 was a wakeup call unlike any other. The data of some 21 million government workers was stolen as a result of the breach, including biometric information of an estimated 5 million people. It was a ground-breaking incident, and it left a bad taste in the mouths of the victims and government IT leaders alike.  Read More